New guidelines for breast cancer survivors push “cheap hormone pills” with horrible side effects like nausea, vomiting and uterine cancer


New, insidious cancer care guidelines were put forth by The United Kingdom’s National Institute for Health Care Excellence (NICE). The guidelines instruct breast cancer survivors to take cheap hormone pills on a daily basis for up to ten years following chemotherapy (if the patient survives the chemotherapy). The current recommendations suggest a steady dose of hormone-blocking pills for five years, but many women stop taking them due to the horrible side effects they experience. These cheap hormone pills have debilitating side effects, hospitalizing women with blood clots and causing osteoporosis. The pills also cause hormonal changes that lead to drastic weight gain. Mockingly, the new NICE guidelines instruct women to exercise this weight away, even though the weight gain is from the drugs’ perpetual hormone disruption.

The goal of NICE is to improve survival rates for women post-chemotherapy, but the new guidelines are nothing more than pharmaceutical industry vomit, aimed at keeping women sick and confused. The drug that NICE wants to push is called tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator that attaches to estrogen receptors in breast cells and blocks estrogen from interacting with cells. This intervention causes many complications within the body.

This chemical intervention causes women to experience hot flashes, mood swings, nausea, vomiting, and weight fluctuations. The estrogenic changes cause menstrual irregularities, changes in sleep patterns and sex drive. The drug can also cause blood clots, osteoporosis, and uterine cancer, which leads to more emergency care and more chemotherapy treatments. Of course, all this stress and degradation of the female body can be avoided by not taking the pills. For better outcomes, women could be advised on healthy eating protocols that restore cellular health and protect the endocrine system.

There are now 55,000 diagnosed cases of breast cancer every year in the UK and no health organizations are pointing out the carcinogens in the drinking water, cosmetics, and personal care products or educating on the importance of antioxidants and healing superfoods. NICE is complicit in a system that is abusing women’s bodies, forcing dependence on pharmaceutical therapies that financially suck society dry and degrade life itself.

The only other lifestyle advice that NICE gives in their new guidelines is for chemotherapy survivors to drink “no more than two glasses of wine each week” and to “do 150 minutes of weekly exercise” to lose weight. In other words, NICE recommends that women obstruct their hormones with tamoxifen (which leads to hormonal weight gain), and then blames women for not exercising their chemotherapy-ravaged bodies enough to lose the weight that the drugs caused. The guidelines don’t take seriously the weakened state of health that chemotherapy had just put the women through. After chemotherapy, a woman’s health is most vulnerable; they are immune-deficient, nauseous, and fatigued. Why don’t the guidelines help women restore their cellular ATP energy production? The guidelines do not recommend any phytonutrients — the only way these women are going to restore their bodies.

Ironically, the chief executive for the charity, Breast Cancer Now, says: “These are really important steps in the right direction for patients with early-stage breast cancer.” Putting women on these hormone pills for an additional five years (for a total of ten years), she believes is “much-needed guidance to help doctors and healthcare professionals translate critical research breakthroughs to NHS patients.” She says if the guidelines are “funded and implemented across the country” it could “save and improve thousands more women’s lives.”

Give me a break.

Upon a breast cancer diagnosis, medical authorities rush women into chemotherapy and hormone therapy regimes, giving them no other options. Women who want to seek detoxification and nutritional therapies are shamed for thinking that way and are forced to go it alone. The ostracizing of nutrition from cancer care inevitably stresses individuals and leads to lower survival rates and poor quality of life. Any real guidelines for cancer care should be based on the work of medical geniuses such as Dr. Max Gerson, who successfully used real food nutrients and detoxification protocols to reverse terminal disease and heal cancer.

To learn more, visit Cancer.News.

Sources include:

DailyMail.co.uk

Nice.Org.uk

BreastCancerNow.org

Health.com

NaturalNews.com



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